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2020 Annual Impact Report

EDUCATE,

PROTECT,

PRESERVE

Land Acknowledgement

Crystal Cove State Park is located on the traditional unceded lands of the Acjachemen and Tongva tribal nations. We are deeply indebted to these nations, whose members remain an important and valued part of our community today.

Crystal Cove Bluffs

By the Numbers

EDUCATE

STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN DISTANCE LEARNING SINCE MARCH 2020

STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN CRYSTAL COVE CONSERVANCY’S EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN CRYSTAL COVE CONSERVANCY’S EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN DISTANCE LEARNING SINCE MARCH 2020

75%

55

33,000

OF STUDENTS FROM UNDERSERVED SCHOOLS PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS STUDENTS WHO HAVE PARTICPATED SINCE 2009

PROTECT

233

BUTTERFLIES OF 23
SPECIES COUNTED BY VOLUNTEERS

126

TIDEPOOL SPECIES IDENTIFIED BY COMMUNITY SCIENTISTS

30

HIGH SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY INTERNS PARTNERING ON 8 CONSERVATION RESEARCH PROJECTS

1

ACRE OF DEGRADED HABITAT RESTORED BY FIFTH GRADE SCIENTISTS

72

MILLIMETER-LONG OWL LIMPET: THE LONGEST MEASURED BY VOLUNTEERS THIS YEAR

PRESERVE

INVESTED IN IMPROVMENTS AND MAINTENANCE WITHIN
CRYSTAL COVE STATE PARK THIS YEAR

THE PARK

INCREASE IN PARK VISITORSHIP SINCE COVID-19

58%

ACRES OF BACKCOUNTRY HABITAT

2400

ACRES IN THE CRYSTAL COVE STATE MARINE CONSERVATION AREA

1150

MILES OF PROTECTED COASTLINE

3.2

COTTAGES ON THE NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES

46

COTTAGES LEFT TO BE RESTORED

17

MORE THAN

 

2,000,000

ANNUAL VISITORS TO CRYSTAL COVE STATE PARK THIS YEAR

 

Teacher Support
Butterfly

A note from the CEO

Breakfast beignets at the Beachcomber.
Early winter sunsets.
Rainy days when the tunnel floods and Los Trancos Creek roars.
Counting butterflies at the Bowl.
Frog songs at night.
The long walk from Abalone Point to Treasure Cove.
Messages written in the sand.
Hot summertime hikes along Moro Ridge.
Backcountry campouts at Deer Canyon.

The osprey, the tidepools, the beaches, the cottages, the trails, the gnatcatchers and snowy plover.

Everyone who visits Crystal Cove finds something to love, and it’s our privilege to partner with our colleagues at State Parks to help safeguard it all and to inspire young people to continue to protect it for generations to come.  As students struggle to keep learning and visitors flock to the park for solace and retreat, your support this year has been both essential and remarkable.

For the last eight months as our team has worked from home offices, guest bedrooms and kitchen tables, you have continued to come through for Crystal Cove – ensuring that students can continue to work as scientists on conservation projects, that important habitat restoration work continues and that all of those things we each love about the Cove remain forever protected.

Thank you for all you do to protect Crystal Cove State Park!

Gratefully,
Kate Wheeler Signature

Kate Wheeler

President & CEO
Crystal Cove Conservancy

Crystal Cove Bluffs

Board of Directors

Gavin Herbert  Chair
Jeffrey Cole  Past Chair
Leslie Ann ‘Teddie’ Ray  1st Vice Chair
Doug Le Bon  2nd Vice Chairman
Richard Swinney  Secretary
Jerry Scheck  Treasurer
Al Bennett  At-Large
Glenn Bozarth
Nathan Chiaverini
Laura Davick, Founder Emeritus
Diana Lu Evans
Ralph Grippo
Michael A. O’Connell
Stephanie Quesada
Caleb Silsby
Eric Smyth

Crystal Cove Conservancy
Executive Staff

Kate WheelerPresident & CEO
Dan GeePresident,
Crystal Cove Beach Cottages

State Park Representative

Eric Dymmel
Central Sector Superintendent,
Orange Coast District,
California State Parks

Crystal Cove Conservancy Team Members

John Adamson
Timothy Arehart
Chris Beiro
Rick Boufford
Erin Broughton
Khai Dang
Emily Delgado
Jordan Diemert
Holly Fletcher
Gregory Foulkes
Randy Gamache
Darrell Hograve
Kathrin Holt
Cheryl Jepsen
Tony Kaspar
Robert Kerman
Emily Killen
Katrina Lopez
Sara Ludovise
Kaitlin Magliano
Kian Maleki
Laura Morgan
Cindy Otto
Jesse Perez-Razo
Ralph Prieto
Myra Radlow
Shelbi Richardson
Andy Schoembs
Judi Simon
Tom Taylor
Erick Valdez
Chelsea Webb
Christian Williams
Matthew Yrad

Our Mission: EDUCATE, PROTECT, PRESERVE

As the nonprofit partner to Crystal Cove State Park, Crystal Cove Conservancy is committed to protecting and preserving the Park’s cultural and natural resources and cultivating a new generation of diverse environmental leaders by using the Cove’s protected lands and water as outdoor classrooms and learning labs, ensuring that Crystal Cove, and places like it, live on for generations.

EDUCATE

This has been a year like no other for our education programs. In March 2020, COVID-19 left teachers, families, and students scrambling as schools closed and our communities shut down. The unspoiled backcountry and stunning bluffs, the sandy beaches and the blue ocean that make up our outdoor classrooms and learning labs were suddenly left to themselves once more. 

Nature was left to recharge, but our work became more important than ever. Our focus immediately shifted from “How can we bring students to the park?” to “How can we bring the park to our students?”

And then something remarkable happened.

The Conservancy launched 17 new distance learning programs between March and September and as word got out to teachers, we saw thousands more students participating in our programs, even as they learned from home. As distance learning continues into 2021, we remain deeply committed to our purpose – to give students the chance to bond with the natural world, become engaged in ongoing scientific research, to begin to see themselves as environmental scientists who can make meaningful change – all at no cost to students or schools.

We couldn’t have done it without you. Throughout the last year, you’ve continued to come through for Crystal Cove. 

IMPACT STATEMENTS.

75% of students came from low income Title 1 schools

Hiking

Crystal Cove Conservancy is committed to access and inclusion for all, ensuring that everyone, particularly those who have been historically excluded from public lands can access all the park has to offer. To mitigate the historic exclusion of Black, Indigenous and People of Color from public lands and the environmental cause itself, we intentionally partner with schools in communities of color and underwrite their costs to participate. Most of the students we serve come from under-resourced inland communities: three-quarters from Title 1 schools, more than half identify as Latino/Latina and almost 50% speak a language other than English at home.

We are likewise committed to creating access for people with disabilities, seniors, and other non-traditional park users. We offer programs for the blind and people with low vision, and help provide access for those with mobility issues by providing free outdoor wheelchairs and supporting ADA-accessible trails and cottages.

104 teachers took part in 8 teacher trainings
Plain Air Painter

We remain deeply committed to supporting our partner teachers in the classroom, especially as distance and hybrid learning continue into 2021. By offering robust tested classroom lessons, extensive professional development, and classroom kits, we’re standing together with teachers in their commitment to real learning.

75% of students said it was the first time they had participated in real scientific research
Surveying Nature

Our programs go beyond designed experiments in the classroom, offering students the opportunity to engage in real science research and positively impact Crystal Cove’s ecosystems.  From learning how to protect native seedlings and monitoring gnatcatchers in our backcountry to analyzing plankton samples and identifying fish in the Crystal Cove SMCA, every student observation has impact, whether it takes place in person on a field trip or afar during distance learning.

33% of students said that their experience influenced their college or career choices
Real Research

We’re so proud of one of our first high school interns. In 2015, she spent the summer helping us design new ways to incorporate technology into our community science programs. Now, she’s completing her master’s in marine biology at UCSD, and is on her way to becoming a researcher in her own right.

Every year, we hear from teachers about more and more of their students deciding to major in STEM fields — and many of them point to their experience at Crystal Cove as the main reason why.

100% said that they thought it was important to understand how California’s coast is changing
Changing Coast

California’s coastline faces tremendous threats — climate change, wildfire, human impact from a growing population. To deal with these incredible challenges, we need more conservationists.

Our education programs position students to investigate how these changes are impacting Crystal Cove State Park directly. As they go through our programs — exploring how the park is changing, analyzing data, and testing possible solutions — the experience provides students with an understanding of how important that work is.

PROTECT

Driving along Pacific Coast Highway, Crystal Cove State Park takes your breath away as it bursts into view. Our park is a special place, made even more so because there are so few places like it left. And sometimes, it’s easy to forget that our remarkable bluffs and backcountry are home to rare habitat and endangered species that are found nowhere else on earth.

Protecting Crystal Cove is a community effort. This year, we worked with UC Irvine researchers and Crystal Cove State Park’s hardworking natural resource management team to help ensure that, together, we can continue to protect the park. Although COVID-19 restricted in-person activity in the park, it’s had no dampening effect on our efforts to protect our precious habitats and landscapes.

Explore the map to learn about some of the conservation projects that, with your support, we’ve been able to help move forward over the past year.

OWL LIMPET

As part of a county-wide collaborative monitoring program run through the Orange County Marine Protected Area Council, Crystal Cove Conservancy partnered with Orange Coast College and UC Irvine students to monitor owl limpets in Crystal Cove’s tidepools.  These quarterly counts help the State Park natural resource team assess how visitation is impacting the park’s tidepools.

Owl Limpet
L

SNAPSHOT CAL COAST

Despite the challenges of COVID-19, 70 volunteers spent hours documenting the plants and animals in our tidepools throughout 2020.  They made over 600 observations and identified over 150 tidepool species.  Their tireless work helps Crystal Cove State Park to understand how our marine ecosystems are changing.

Ochre Star
L

BEACH MONITORING

As the infrastructure portion of the North Beach cottage restoration neared completion this year, we worked with coastal engineers from UC Irvine and underserved high school students to monitor how Crystal Cove State Park’s beaches are changing.

Conservation
L

PROJECT CRYSTAL SITE

We continue to work arm-in-arm with students to continue the restoration of the one-acre Project Crystal site near the ranger station in Moro Canyon. This year, ten high school interns partnered with a researcher from Pomona College to study how mulch impacts invasive ant populations in Crystal Cove State Park.

Ant Video
L

MICHAEL & TRICIA BERNS ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY LOOP

Just as the Michael & Tricia Berns Environmental Study Loop welcomes visitors to Moro Canyon, it has also become the gateway to community science and conservation research for thousands of students and park visitors.

Michael & Trisha Berns
L

THE BOWL

The first phase of the Bowl restoration project came to a close this year, as UC Irvine researchers helped identify the best native seed mix to use when restoring this incredibly challenging site. This 10-acre restoration site remains a high priority project for Crystal Cove State Park staff over the next few years.

Bowl Restoration
L
BUTTERFLY MONITORING

Since 2017, Crystal Cove Conservancy’s extraordinary volunteers have been tracking the diversity and abundance of butterfly species in Moro Canyon. This helps us better understand the health of the entire ecosystem. This year, even with counts being limited due to COVID-19 restrictions, we continued to document butterflies near priority restoration sites in Moro Canyon.

Monarch Butterfly
L

PRESERVE
The Heritage Legacy Project for California:
A note from the Committee Chair and Founder, Laura Davick

Crystal Cove North Beach

Photo: Fred Emmert, airviews.com

When I founded Crystal Cove Conservancy more than 20 years ago, we had big dreams and a bold vision for what this place could become, and we knew the restoration of our beloved beach cottages would be a key to achieving that vision. 

I’m so pleased to be writing to you now, as we close out the infrastructure portion of the project and prepare for the first phase of cottage restoration over the coming days. The crew has completed the installation of more than 17 debris and retaining walls behind the cottages on the North Beach, the installation of power, water lines, and lift stations, and, if you’ve been by recently, you’re sure to have seen the removal of the chain link fence with the completion of the concrete pathway that will become a 650 foot long boardwalk running the length of the project along the beach.

When we began the North Beach restoration, four of the 17 cottages had to be completely disassembled, removed and placed in safe storage to provide access to the project. Now, some of those cottages will be returned to their original locations, restored to their midcentury roots, and eventually opened to the public as five new affordable overnight coastal accommodations. 

And all of that matters – perhaps more than you know. 

We’ve often heard people say that The Conservancy saved the Cottages, but the truth is, the cottages have saved Crystal Cove. These cottages, on their once-shaky foundations have held back the rising tide of development bearing down from all sides and have held fast to their original purpose – to be a gathering place for families and neighbors from all backgrounds – in doing so, they have become the true center of Crystal Cove State Park supporting important work in education and conservation.

Like so many relationships in the park, this one is a symbiotic relationship.

PROTECT

Student-collected data then, in turn, informs land managers’ responses to critical conservation questions in the Park and beyond through contribution to shared databases.

EDUCATE

In turn, these education programs, while developing young scientists’ minds and connections to our planet, provide rigorous and engaging science education for students through hands-on work on important conservation and habitat restoration work and research in the backcountry, in the water and on the beaches to mitigate decades of human impact.

PRESERVE

The cottages and food concessions in the park provide revenue and facilities to support important STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education programs in the Park and beyond.

PROTECT

Student-collected data then, in turn, informs land managers’ responses to critical conservation questions in the Park and beyond through contribution to shared databases.

EDUCATE

In turn, these education programs, while developing young scientists’ minds and connections to our planet, provide rigorous and engaging science education for students through hands-on work on important conservation and habitat restoration work and research in the backcountry, in the water and on the beaches to mitigate decades of human impact.

PRESERVE

The cottages and food concessions in the park provide revenue and facilities to support important STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education programs in the Park and beyond.

The completion of the The Heritage Legacy Project for California is essential to our ability to continue to grow our work in education and conservation – ensuring that Crystal Cove and places like it live on for generations.

It has been an honor and joy to lead the campaign working to ensure the completion of this critical final project at Crystal Cove. Our success, in large part is because of you – our donors, supporters, colleagues and neighbors – who continue to come through as pledgemakers, advocates and friends. We remain filled with hope and gratitude as our shared vision of a fully restored Crystal Cove State Park inches ever closer to fulfillment.

Thank you for your support and friendship.

Laura Davick
Laura Davick
Laura Davick
Founder, Crystal Cove Conservancy
Chair, The Heritage Legacy Project for California

Heritage Legacy Project for California
Donors and Pledgemakers

North Beach Champions ($5 Million and above)
California Coastal Commission
California State Coastal Conservancy

Cove Conservationists ($1.5M-$4,999,999)
Anonymous

Crystal Benefactors ($500,000-999,999)
Eva and Doug Le Bon
WWW Foundation – In Honor of M.H. Whittier

Cove Philanthropists ($100,000-499,999)
Glenn Bozarth
The Cheng Family in memory of Bao-ding Cheng
City of Newport Beach
BMJ Gregory Charitable Foundation, Bonnie Gregory
Michael Ray
Teddie Ray

Cove Contributors ($50,000-99,999)
Anonymous
Lori and Harley Bassman
Jeffrey and Paula Cole
Laura Davick
Gavin and Kerry Herbert
Stella Hiatt
James J. Moloney and Erin C. Walsh-Moloney
Mike and Linda Mussallem
Steen Family
Shelley B. Thunen 

Cove Neighbors ($25,000-49,999)
Christine Carr, in Honor of Larry B. Porter
Crystal Cove Beach Cottages
Pierre and Judy d’Albert
Pat and Bonnie Fuscoe
Dan and Rosalie Gee
Patty and Greg Penske Family
Sheets, Paqette, and Wu Dental Practice
Ann and Eric Smyth
Jennifer Steele and Jay Bauer, in Memory of Vivian Vance Taft
Richard and Jody Swinney
Laura Tarbox

North Beach Donors ($1000-24,999)
Al Bennett and Rudi Berkelhamer
Lori Steen Bloom
Barbara Boatman
Karen Carlson
Alfred (Bud) Carter
Steven Craig
Gareth and Diana Evans
Carol Fontana
Mike and Karol Gottfredson
Doug Grossman
Lynn April and Gene Hartline
Randy Higbee Book Sales
Barbara and Wendell Maberry
Sue and Farmer Marschall
Jock, Lili, Ian, and Sean McGraw
Beverly and Bruce Nickerson
Stephanie Quesada and Vince Jackson
Deborah and Frank Rugani
Carolyn Sams
Gerald and Christine Scheck
Al Willinger

Special thanks to those who have provided critical advice and made program-related investments in this important historic preservation initiative including the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Resources Legacy Fund, and WWW Foundation in Honor of M.H. Whittier.

Consolidated Statement of Financial Position
Assets Jun. 30, 2020 Jun. 30 2019
Cash and cash equivalents $3,632,667 $2,921,108
Accounts and pledges receivable 244,938 495,371
Inventory 51,248 44,995
Prepaid expenses 30,059 67,882
Investments 3,623,853 9,546,093
FIA prepaid contract obligations 6,441,072 4,363,861
Property and equipment, net 48,367 63,154
TOTAL ASSETS $14,072,204 $17,502,464
Liabilities
Accounts payable $1,083,233 $1,228,371
Accrued expenses 374,468 128,020
Accrued interest payable 15,259 65,207
Deferred revenue 784,032 787,212
PPP loan advance 359,649
Long-term debt 8,311,700 10,000,000
Total Liabilities $10,928,341 $12,208,810
Commitments and Contingencies
Net Assets
Without donor restrictions
Board-designated for restoration activities $52,462 $52,462
Board-designated for endowment 67,514 68,358
Undesignated 1,019,987 2,482,515
Total without Donor Restrictions 1,139,963 2,603,335
With donor restrictions 2,003,900 2,690,259
Total Net Assets 3,143,86 5,293,594
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS $14,072,204 $17,502,404
Whale
Crystal Cove Conservancy is committed to using our resources responsibly:
Program Expenses: 92.3%
Management/General: 4.4%
Fundraising: 3.3%

Statement of Activities

Revenue and Support Without Donor Restrictions With Donor Restrictions Total 2020 Total 2019
Pledges and contributions $352,624 $1,404,342 $1,756,966 $1,283,158
Special events, net 168,108 242,950 411,058 469,254
Memberships 124,903 124,903 173,220
Interpretive Store revenue, net 203,752 203,752 280,959
Cottage rental income 1,111,005 1,111,005 1,434,062
Concessionaire income 1,476,740 1,476,740 1,622,656
Investment income, net 22,876 129,027 151,903 350,786
Net assets released from restriction 2,462,678 (2,462,678) 0 0
Total Revenue and Support $5,922,686 ($686,359) $5,236,327 $5,614,095
Expenses
Program
Concessionaire activities $1,450,166 0 $1,450,166 $1,678,109
Interpretive activities 666,361 0 666,361 736,908
Restoration activities 3,677,259 0 3,677,259 4,754,637
Cottage operations 1,023,438 0 1,023,438 1,149,839
Total Program Expense $6,817,224 $0 $6,817,224 $8,319,493
Administrative 327,792 0 327,792 288,219
Fundraising 241,042 0 241,042 308,406
Total Expenses $7,386,058 $0 $7,386,058 $8,916,118
Change in Net Assets (1,463,372) (686,359) (2,149,731) (3,302,023)
Net Assets, beginning of year 2,603,335 2,690,259 5,293,594 8,595,617
Net Assets, end of year 1,139,963 2,003,900 3,143,863 5,293,594

Thank you!

Lifetime Giving (through June 30, 2020) 

All donors who have given $25,000 or more in total are listed with cumulative lifetime giving totals. 

$1 Million and Above
Anonymous 
Michael and Tricia Berns 
California Coastal Commission
California Cultural and Historical Endowment
California State Coastal Conservancy

$500,000 – $999,999 
Gardner Grout Foundation
Eva and Doug Le Bon 
Massen Greene Foundation
The Resort at Pelican Hill

$250,000 – $499,999 
Beachcomber Management Crystal Cove, LLC
Laura Davick 
HKA, Inc. Marketing Communications, Hilary Kaye 
Newport Landing Whale Watching  
Samueli Foundation
University of California, Irvine
WWW Foundation – In Honor of M.H. Whittier

$100,000 – $249,999 
Anonymous
Rick Aversano 
BMJ Gregory Charitable Foundation, Bonnie Gregory
Capital Group/Capital Group Co. Charitable Foundation 
City of Newport Beach
Collazo Trust
Crystal Cove Beach Cottages
Firebrand Media LLC
Hexberg Family Foundation
Joan Irvine Smith & Athalie R. Clarke Foundation
Montage Laguna Beach
Mara and Keith Murray 
Mike and Linda Mussallem 
Tricia Nichols 
Teddie Ray 
Roger’s Gardens
Wendy and Fred Salter 
Susan Tate 
Ueberroth Family Foundation
Weingart Foundation

$50,000 – $99,999 
Anonymous
Annenberg Foundation
Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation
Lori and Harley Bassman 
California State Parks Foundation
Christine Carr 
COAST Magazine
Jeffrey and Paula Cole 
Croul Family Foundation
Cygnet Foundation
Karol and Mike Gottfredson 
Stella Hiatt 
Marriott’s Newport Coast Villas
Pacific Life Foundation
REI
Resources Legacy Fund Foundation
Joan Irvine Smith 
Southern California Edison
Laura Tarbox 
Shelley B. Thunen 
Tourbillon and OMEGA (US)
Dr. Tammy Wong, Fostering Executive Leadership, Inc. 
Ellen Wragge 
Nancy and Arn Youngman 

$25,000 – $49,999 
4LEAF, Inc.
Wylie and Bette Aitken 
Allergan Foundation
Bill and Angela Ashmore
Al Bennett and Rudi Berkelhamer 
Rick and Diana Boufford 
Glenn Bozarth 
Comerica Private Banking
Cox Cares
Lucy Donahue  
Diana Lu and Gareth Evans 
First Foundation Bank
Fuscoe Engineering, Inc.
Dan and Rosalie Gee 
Jackson Lewis P.C.
Barbara and Greg MacGillivray 
Jeri and Danny McKenna 
Mikimoto America
Miller Environmental, Inc.
James J. Moloney and Erin C. Walsh-Moloney
Neiman Marcus
Sonia and Victor Nichols 
Annette and Bucky Oltmans 
Orange County Community Foundation
Natasha and Todd Palmaer 
Christine Pappas and Hugh Bradley 
PBS SoCal
Patty and Greg Penske Family 
Stephanie Quesada and Vince Jackson 
Michael Ray 
Ann and Eric Smyth 
Jennifer Steele and Jay Bauer 
Steen Family Foundation
Jody and Richard Swinney 
Wells Fargo
Western Digital Foundation
Wheeler Foundation
Greg and Sharon Wohl 
Young’s Market Company

Annual Giving (July 1, 2019 through June 30, 2020)

Donors who have given $25,000 or more in their lifetimes are listed above with their cumulative giving.

$10,000 – $24,999 
Argyros Family Foundation
Coastal Quest – Ocean Protection Council
Confidence Foundation
Henry L Guenther, Jr. Foundation
Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian
International Paper Foundation
John Kendall
Susie and Bob McIntosh
Sheets, Paqette, and Wu Dental Practice
Ginny and Peter Ueberroth

$5,000 – $9,999 
Angels Baseball Foundation
Anonymous
Julie and Nate Chiaverini
Kim Clemens
Michelle and Tim Dean
Jack and Anne Gallagher
Karol and Mike Gottfredson
Jack and Sara Lowell
Jim McAleer
Joni Ravenna and Mitchell Sussman
RockForce Construction
Rosanna and Andy Rocker
Deborah and Frank Rugani
Diane and Rodney Sawyer
Cherilyn Sheets and Mark Moehlman

$1,000-$4,999 
Anonymous
Jill Adams
Chris Alan Music
Kathleen Andersen
Baxter Kuo Family Fund
Jane and Charlie Birmingham
Lori Bloom
Jim Bradford and Debbie Howard
Meriam Braselle
John Budicin
Dr. James T. Caillouette and Gabrielle White
Karen Clark
David Degenhardt
Rick Delanty
Carol and Dell DeRevere
Expedia, Inc.
Farmers & Merchants Bank
Foundation for Sustainability and Innovation
Maria Furcolow
Bonnie and Pat Fuscoe
Gene Gamache
Gemini Timing
Tiffany Gillis
Betty and Bob Grant
Angela and Ed Grasso
Doug Grossman
Aaron and Jaci Gurewitz
Dr. Barbara Hamkalo
Gene and April Hartline
Higbee Gallery
Mary Hobbs
Sue and Paul Jarosz
Lynn and Dave Jochim
Suzanne and Robert Kaiser
Marty Kanselbaum
Katy and Dean Kitchens
Knobbe Martens 
Dorothy Larson
Julie Laughton
Cheryl and Mark Law
Marcia and Hank Lawson
Jean Lien
Barbara and Wendell Maberry
Barbara and Scott Maccabe 
Jean Marie
Mary and Bruce McDonald
Lili and Jock McGraw
David McLaren and Diane Nelson
Rachel and Bryan Milton
Miriam Moore
Carrie and Don Nikols
Michael Obermeyer
Mayor Will and Jenny O’Neill
Orange County Department of Education 
James Papazis
PIMCO 
Steve and Desiree Ralph Family Foundation
Janet and Walkie Ray
Elka Rieder and Gene Nalbandian
Marisa and Stephen Robbins
R. Roland Smith Family Foundation
Gerald and Christine Scheck 
Rosalba Schimmel
Laura and Steve Scully
Jeff Sewell
Diane Shammas
Drs. Jean and Evan Siegel
W. Jason Situ
Brian and Maria Smith
Paula and William Steele
Jordan Sukut
Jerry and Doniel Sutton
Tom Swimm
James Swinden
Scott and Lisa Taylor
John Thompson
Meghan and Louis Weil

$500 – $999 
Brant Aberg
Paulette Alexander
Gaja and Piotr Andzel
Diane and Jim Bailey
Paige and Bill Baker
Balboa Bay Resort
Joli Beal
The Benevity Community Impact Fund 
Richard Berg
Courtney and Tim Blackburn
Jennifer Bolanis-Rogers – Get Organized, Inc.
Gobind Boyes
Jean Brodhead
Garrett Calacci
Phillip Capriccio
James and Ursula Carter
Tim and Rosalind Casey
Christine Coleman
Cynthia Conlon
John Connell
Susie Crider
Kevin Davidson
Nate and Liz deSousa
Daliborka Despotovic
Disney VoluntEARS 
Laura Doyle and Bill Rose
John Eagle
Feyzi Fatehi
Barbara Ferguson
Carol Fontana
Pauline Frye
Tim and Mary Gannon
Maile and Gunther Gee
Lawrence Goelman and Virginia Cirica
Scott and Jane Hermes
The Irvine Museum 
Craig G. Johnson
J. Stanley and Mary W. Johnson Family Foundation 
Frances King
Barbara and Paul Krause
Lori and John Lambert
LASIK Center Medical Group, Inc,. Dr. Alexandra Chebil
Law Offices of Jonathan Franklin 
Lorin Backe Photography
Margaret Lown
AJ Manas
Daniel Marshall
Beth and Robert Marusi
Roxanne McCafferty
Edward Merrilees
Jana and Michael Miller
Kirsten and Tom Minasian
Kimberly and David Monasterio
Erich Neubert
Newport Coastal Adventure
Dan Nilsen
Gail and Peter Ochs
Steve and Gail Orens
Hannah Palmaer
Angie and Rich Parker
Heather Pearson Norton
Cottie and Colin Petrie-Norris
Col. Eric N. Piper USMC (Ret)
Jan Ray
Gena Reed
Katherine and Stephen Ricossa
Gina Rosanski
Doug and Kirtsen Rugg
Elizabeth Salter
Marcus Seiden
Marja Dawn and Michael Selna
Claudette Shaw
Roxanne and Daniel Stetson
Marcia Stevens
Donna Stocking
Tom and Marilyn Sutton
Keith Swayne
Josh and Anna Trinh
Sheryl and Chris Van Ruiten
Ghaddi Vasquez
Richard Vogel
Adrea Wirl
William Woolley
Ann and Roger Worthington
Darlene Young
Peter Zeughauser and Qing Ye
Michael Zindell

Legacy Donors

Thank you to our supporters who have included Crystal Cove Conservancy in their estate plans.

Pierre and Judy d’Albert
Wendy and Kevin Cox
Laura Davick
Carol Fallon
Doug Grossman
Karen Eglin Living Trust

“A Night In With Crystal Cove” fundraiser

After hosting 17 galas outdoors on the bluff top, like the rest of the world in 2020, we shifted gears and took our 18th annual fundraiser virtual for “A Night In With Crystal Cove,”  supporting our Science, Technology, Education and Math (STEM) school programs for underserved students. Our title partner, The Resort at Pelican Hill, was there every step of the way providing delicious meals to go for our sponsors. We had no idea what to expect and were beyond grateful for the support we received from our sponsors, supporters, and our community. We raised over $420,000, rivaling what our in-person events have raised over the years. We toasted our dear friend and longtime supporter, Madeline Swinden, who we lost this year and will be forever in our hearts and part of our Cove magic. We were honored to have Carl Safina, award-winning author and ecologist, as our guest speaker to share a thoughtful conversation about his work, his travels and our shared effort to inspire the next generation of scientists. In an unprecedented and unpredictable year, our supporters came through for us in a big way.

Happy Crew

Crystal Cove State Park has always been a rare jewel along Orange County’s coastline: a burst of unspoiled green amidst a sea of urban gray, that one unchanging place in the sun. This year, when so many of us have spent more time than we’d like indoors and away from the people we care about, the tranquility of the Cove has become more important to us than ever before. It is space to recharge, a place to connect, and a reminder that the world will still be here waiting for us when it is safe for us to gather together once more.

Thank you for your support!

©2021 Crystal Cove Conservancy